THE HOUSE ON THE PROPS

Mandy & Steve welcome you

ABOUT THE PROPS

Welcome to the House on the Props. Steve and Mandy Shephard bought the ‘Props’ in January 2001, both trained as Bakers and Pastry Chefs for 5 years in Leicestershire, with the dream of opening their own patisserie in Cornwall, the Props took 20 years to find. Up to purchasing the Props, Steve worked as a Manager in various bakeries in the UK and Mandy going into other areas in the food industry worked in Europe Mexico and USA.
‘We started the Props as a Tea Rooms making all our own cakes & pastries and multi-grain walnut bread, and for the last 15 years growing our evening trade with fresh Cornish produce and fish. We try to give good quality local Cornish wholesome foods, beers and wines as well as value for money. Please be patient if we are busy as all our food is cooked from fresh ingredients to give you the customer, the best possible Cornish food and service.

THE STORY OF THE 'PROPS'

Polperro was at one time, an isolated fishing community, where smuggling was a traditional occupation. The Props Cottage of those days boasted a secret staircase leading from the river.

Crushana Northcott, one of many local characters lived in
“The Props”. A Story about her was that she used to warn
smugglers of the approach of “Preventive Men” by adding a
doll dressed as an Customs man to in her shop window. Her son
died aged 10, when falling off a cliff while picking herbs and her
husband was lost out at sea. She has been seen sitting in the
window above the restaurant looking out to sea and awaiting her
husbands return.

The beams and masts in the ‘Props’ restaurant came from the
S.S. Maverine which foundered in circa 1700.

POLPERRO HISTORY & CHARM

There were times when Smuggling was as much an industry in
Polperro as the fishing; so much so that, early in the last century,
King George III found it necessary to station a crew of customs
officers on an old boat in the harbour,–perhaps the first regular
unit of the preventive service. It has been said that the ingenuity
of the people of Polperro exceeded that of the revenue men, and a
few minutes spent wandering around the streets near the harbour
will lead you to think of those good old days.

From either side of Polperro Harbour, footpaths climb to the coastal
path. Chapel (pronounced ‘Chaypel’) Cliff to the west provides fine
terraced walks, framed for their wild flowers, as does the Warren,
on the eastern side. Looking back from the coastal path there is a
delightful birds eye view of the most photographed haven in the
country.

Polperro is still a working fishing village and the local fishermen
come into the harbour on the high tides. The harbour is owned by
the village and Trustees meet monthly to decide the future.
All donations are put back into its up-keep.